DEWEY HOUSE
Dewey is signified by a sky blue colour.
Reverend Dewey came to India in 1919 and visited Mount Hermon Estate on orders of the Missionary Society, while the school was being built largely using rock mined from the wooded area of the land. He is the most recent of the Four House heroes and was the Principal during 1945-47 and 1951-53. He was a great missionary leader and he spent 42 years in India, working in Bihar and Bengal. During his stay at Mount Hermon he spoke fondly of the interschool competitions and the development of peace and goodwill in the community.
   FISHER HOUSE
Fisher is signified by the colour yellow
Bishop Fred B.Fisher was born in 1882 in Pennsylvania, USA. Encouraged by Bishop Thoburn, a young Fisher decided to go to India as a missionary. He was on intimate terms with Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore. Gandhi speaks of him fondly in a letter – “ He seemed to me one of the few Christians who walked in fear of the Lord, and, therefore feared no man. In the course of his work, he was instrumental in acquiring the land necessary for the foundation of the institution and gave the school its current name.
   STAHL HOUSE
Stahl is signified by the colour red
Carolyn J.Stahl belonged to the Women’s Foreign Missionary Society and cae to India in 1893 as a member of the Methodist Church in Calcutta. Her tenure as school Principal dates from 1918 to 1929, however she assisted Emma Knowles from as early as 1900. During a financially turbulent period, she persuaded the Government Education Department to offer assistance in the building of a non-conformist educational institute in Darjeeling. She insightfully wrote, “the greatest asset any school can have is the confidence and sympathy of the community it serves”.
   KNOWLES HOUSE
Knowles is signified by the colour Green
Emma Knowles was born in New Jersey in 1840 and she spent thirty five of her years in India. During the period she founded three schools, Wellesley, Naini Tal and Queen’s Hill for Anglo Indian girls in Darjeeling. Aware of the necessity of a school for the children of her community in Darjeeling, she borrowed money and paid the rent of a building out of her missionary salary and started a school with thirteen pupils. Much later, in the 1920’s when the estate was acquired she received news of the fulfilment of her prayers with great joy.